Hartwood

Hartwood is a new-ish restaurant in Tulum, built, owned and operated by former Brooklynite couple Mya Henry and Eric Werner. All of the produce is locally grown, purchased daily and cooked in a wood burning oven.

 

When Rubin and I heard about Hartwood, we were determined to visit on the only day they would be open while we were in Mexico, despite having to travel an hour to get there after our 9 hour plane/bus trip from NY. We had to rally pretty hard but it was absolutely worth it. Everything about this restaurant is beautiful. The food is beautiful, the environment is beautiful, the couple who own it are beautiful. We didn't have to be there for very long before we decided it was the ideal place for our rehearsal dinner. It's the perfect blend of chic Brooklyness and paradise. I literally can't wait.

 

Did I mention there were three puppies playing under our table the whole time? Heaven.

Via The Selby

Olea/Easter/I Love NYC

New York City has some really perfect days sometimes. If you don't live/haven't lived here, you can't really understand what I mean because you have to suffer through all the crappy days New York dishes out to really appreciate a perfect New York day. You have to suffer through months of bad weather, litter, people who don't pick up after their dogs, tourists, snobs, pretense and hipsters. You have to live with the snobby pretentious hipster you've turned into. You have to go on dates to places where there are models...real ones...standing next to you being hella tall. But then, all of the sudden, it's Spring and it's warm and the air smells so good and everything is neon green. Then it's all boozy weekend brunches in every cuisine you can think of, warm nights out with friends, bartenders that make your cocktails with so much care it's like their lives depend on it, parks with infinite green fields so peaceful it's creepy. And you remember why you are willing to take so much sh*t to be here. New York is that boyfriend you dated in college who was super hot but totally inappropriate for you. He treated you like crap most of the time but always took you to the hottest clubs, was amazing in bed and had an accent. You were so smitten you stayed with him WAY longer than you should have. Eventually you wised up and moved on, but you still think about him sometimes and yearn. I know that my days in New York are numbered but after eight years here, days like today still remind me that no place in the world kills it like NYC. The poison is in the wound, you see. And the wound will never heal.

Olea is one of our favorite restaurants. We come here mostly for dinner to stuff our faces with Mediterranean tapas and very reasonably priced wine but their brunch is out of this world. It was an obvious choice for Easter.

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Freshly baked, piping hot chocolate croissants? Sure, I'll take a vat of them. Just bury me in it and I'll eat my way out, thanks.

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Parmesan french toast with poached eggs, sweet peas and avgolemono.

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It's strange how frequently eggs are popping up in my posts since I don't eat them very often but when I do I always go organic, local and genuinely humanely raised. We get ours delivered every few weeks from an Amish farm in Pennsylvania. The tell tale sign of an organic egg laid by a healthy chicken is a crazy bright, neon orange yolk. There is really nothing better.

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After a few mimosas with fresh squeezed oj, I lost my head and ate every bite. I only licked the plate a little...

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Samurai Mama

Yesterday was my birthday and Rubin took me to dinner at Samurai Mama. I have wanted to go there for awhile but am always skeptical of Japanese restaurants. My grandmother had a huge hand in raising me (I saw her almost everyday until she passed away when I was 18) and her cooking was out of this world. Needless to say, I have very high standards. I am also a vegetarian and many Japanese restaurants are not super veg-friendly. Samurai Mama was epic. On the menu is a collection of small plates, sushi and a variety of udon styles and toppings. The restaurant is beautiful and everything we ate was heart warming and delicious. Did I mention they have an imported Japanese water filtration system so all the water used in the food preparation, all the water for the dashi broth and all the water you drink is "the purest, cleanest water you will ever try in New York"? Did I mention it's cheap? It's my new favorite place. 

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House-made tsukemono and my shiso mojito.

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The kabocha pumpkin cooked in sweet dashi tasted just like my grandmother's.

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Inari and soy sauce three ways; plain, with a little wasabi, with lots of wasabi. So convenient.

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For me, this is the ultimate comfort food. I'd take it over mac and cheese any day.

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The hoji tea pudding was delicious but I really wish they had some daifuku or kanten desserts. That would REALLY make me feel like a kid again. Maybe someday.

Yum.

The Chocolate Room

It is very dangerous to get drunk in Park Slope because it always means I will end up here. The Chocolate Room has the most incredibly decadent, sinful, orgasmic desserts in NYC. Everything is made from scratch onsite. Their chocolate layer cake is the best cake I've ever had. Did I mention they have booze and are open till midnight on weekends? Every dessert come with a pairing suggestion. This place is basically heaven. 

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Yum.